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Saturday, February 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Celtic twilight ; and stories of Red Hanrahan found in the catalog.

Celtic twilight ; and stories of Red Hanrahan

William Butler Yeats

Celtic twilight ; and stories of Red Hanrahan

being the fifth volume of The collected works in verse & prose of William Butler Yeats.

by William Butler Yeats

  • 34 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by The Shakespeare Head Press in Stratford-on-Avon .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Other titlesThe Celtic twilight., Stories of Red Hanrahan.
The Physical Object
Pagination[10],261,[1]p., plate [frontis.] ;
Number of Pages261
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16806318M

But Hanrahan turned his back on them as if angry, and in place of dancing he began to sing, and as he sang he held her hand, and his voice grew louder, and the mocking of the young men stopped, and the fiddle stopped, and there was nothing heard but his voice that had in it the sound of the wind. And look up now,' she said, 'for the wisps that are for our wedding are lighted. One fine May morning a long time after Hanrahan had left Margaret Rooney's house, he was walking the road near Collooney, and the sound of the birds singing in the bushes that were white with blossom set him singing as he went. Where was I for the whole year?

He was glad enough to go with her, and to find a woman to be listening to the story of his troubles and to be comforting him. But it is old and broken he looked going home that day with the stoop in his shoulders and the darkness in his face. And whether it was that time or another time he made the song that is called to this day 'The Twisting of the Rope,' and that begins, 'What was the dead cat that put me in this place,' is not known. The emerald isle is, to many, synonymous with legends of faeries and folk tales of the unseen world. Come, heart, where hill is heaped upon hill, For there the mystical brotherhood Of hollow wood and the hilly wood And the changing moon work out their will. He turned up the path to it, for he never had the habit of passing by any place where there was music or dancing or good company, without going in.

And when he was well covered with the heather she went out of the door and away down the side of the mountain, and he could hear her cry, 'I am beautiful, I am beautiful,' getting less and less as she went, till at last it died away altogether. He sat down on a big stone, and he began swinging his right arm and singing slowly to himself, the way he did always to hearten himself when every other thing failed him. And it seemed to him that the little soft rose leaves as they went fluttering down into the valley began to change their shape till they looked like a troop of men and women far off in the mist, with the colour of the roses on them. He turned up the path to it, for he never had the habit of passing by any place where there was music or dancing or good company, without going in. Perhaps the Gaelic people shall by his like bring back again the ancient simplicity and amplitude of imagination.


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Celtic twilight ; and stories of Red Hanrahan book

She was poor, but her clothes every day were the same as Sunday, she had such neatness. She had no good name at that time, and it was the priest routed her out of the place at last. Enough said of offerings which speak loudly for themselves.

It was a good change to him to have shelter from the wet, and a fire in the evening time, and his share of food put on the table without the asking. And when he had mended the thatch and made a bed in the corner with a few sacks and bushes, and had swept out the floor, he was well content to have a little place for himself, where he could go in and out as he liked, and put his head in his hands through the length of an evening if the fret was on him, and loneliness after the old times.

She had no good name at that time, and it was the priest routed her out of the place at last. She passed by him with her eyes wide open, and her head high, and her arms hanging straight beside her, and she went into the shadow of the hills towards the west.

Celtic Revival

We go wandering together for ever, but Dermot that was my lover sees me always as a body that has been a long time in the ground, and I know that is the way he sees me. When they brought out the cards he took them and began to shuffle them, and while he was shuffling them something seemed to come into his mind, and he put his hand to his face like one that is trying to remember, and he said: 'Was I ever here before, or where was I on a night like this?

His hand had grown heavy on the blackthorn he leaned on, and his cheeks were hollow and worn, but so far as food went, potatoes and milk and a bit of oaten cake, he had what he wanted of it; and it is not on the edge of so wild and boggy a place as Echtge a mug of spirits would be wanting, with the taste of the turf smoke on it.

Two things struck me during my reading of this book. Hanrahan was walking the roads one time near Kinvara at the fall of day, and he heard the sound of a fiddle from a house a little way off the roadside.

When Hanrahan awoke, the sun was shining on his face, but there was white frost on the grass around him, and there was ice on the edge of the stream he was lying by, and that goes running on through Daire- caol and Druim-da-rod.

And what he sang was a song he had heard or had made one time in his wanderings on Slieve Echtge, and the words of it as they can be put into English were like this: O Death's old bony finger Will never find us there In the high hollow townland Where love's to give and to spare; Where boughs have fruit and blossom At all times of the year; Where rivers are running over With red beer and brown beer.

There was a fire on the old hearth, and there were dip candles stuck in bottles, and there was a black quart bottle upon some boards that had been put across two barrels to make a table.

Louis Sullivanthe Chicago architect, incorporated dense Art Nouveau and Celtic-inspired interlace in the ornament of his buildings. Ask me more, ask me more, for all the years have left their wisdom in my heart, and no one has listened to me for seven hundred years. But Hanrahan did not laugh, but he sat down very quietly, without a word.

Hanrahan sat down on a heap of turf beside the door, for he was tired out and out, and had no wish for talking or for card-playing, and his bones and his joints aching the way they were. Yeats himslef gave to this collection of Irish stories of the supernatural and uncanny, based on country beliefs, traditions and folk tales, and originally published in the 'ninties in The Celtic Twilight, The Secret Rose, and Stories of Red Hanrahan.

He includes his own opinions and commentary and alleges that the ancient pagan spirits and the Catholicism of modern Ireland live in harmony together.

But clouds had come over the sky, and he could not well see his way, and after he had gone a few steps his foot slipped and he fell into a bog drain, and though he dragged himself out of it, holding on to the roots of the heather, the fall had given him a great shake, and he felt better fit to lie down than to go travelling.

According to the comic, the Gaulish village where Asterix lives is in the Armorica peninsulawhich is now Brittany. And it is with the rest of the poets I myself will be sitting and talking in some far place beyond the world, to the end of life and time,' he said.

Just as he said that, there came in at the half-door Oona, the daughter of the house, having a few bits of bog deal from Connemara in her arms for the fire. Condition: Near Fiine.

The encounters Yeats writes of are the meetings between the Irish people and the faeries, but equally interesting are those other encounters: the meetings between the young Protestant poet and the Catholic Irish who tell him their ancient stories so that he can write them down in this book.

The birds in the air, the moths under the leaves, the flies over the water look at me. And it seemed to him that the little soft rose leaves as they went fluttering down into the valley began to change their shape till they looked like a troop of men and women far off in the mist, with the colour of the roses on them.The Collected Works in Verse and Prose of William Butler Yeats, Vol.

4 (of 8): The Hour-glass. Cathleen ni Houlihan. The Golden Helmet. The Irish Dramatic Movement: The Collected Works in Verse and Prose of William Butler Yeats, Vol. 5 (of 8): The Celtic Twilight and Stories of Red Hanrahan. Stories of Red Hanrahan. By. William Butler Yeats.

0 This book is available for free download in a number of formats - including epub, pdf, azw, mobi and more. You can also read the full text online using our ereader. Book Excerpt.

The Celtic Twilight. The Land of Heart's Desire. Jun 01,  · Read "The Celtic Twilight" by W. B. Yeats available from Rakuten Kobo. W.B. Yeats was a towering figure in twentieth-century letters.

Though best remembered as Brand: The Floating Press. RED HANRAHAN'S CURSE HANRAHAN'S VISION THE DEATH OF HANRAHAN. I owe thanks to Lady Gregory, who helped me to rewrite The Stories of Red Hanrahan in the beautiful country speech of Kiltartan, and nearer to the tradition of the people among whom he, or some likeness of him, drifted and is remembered.

RED HANRAHAN. Hanrahan, the hedge schoolmaster. Many of the tales in this book were told me by one Paddy Flynn, a little bright-eyed old man, who lived in a leaky and one-roomed cabin in the village of Ballisodare. He was a great teller of tales, and unlike our common romancers, knew how to empty heaven, hell, and purgatory, faeryland and earth, to 4/5(K).

Through successive versions of the stories, Yeats became more interested in Red Hanrahan’s occult and mythological significance, assigning increasingly visionary powers to his hero.

Other sections of the book had an overtly occult content, revolving around themes of excessive mysticism and apocalypse.